bunnies

Five of the 47 rabbits acquired by the PSPCA were able to be transported to the Animal Welfare Associatiuon (AWA) from the horrendous conditions they had to endure from a hoarding situation in Lancaster County.

VOORHEES >> Small, cramped outdoor cages, unsanitary conditions, usually it is a story about hoarding cats or dogs, but bunnies? Last month dozens of rabbits and bunnies were rescued from a hoarding situation in Lancaster County.

Five of the 47 rabbits acquired by the PSPCA were able to be transported to the Animal Welfare Associatiuon (AWA) from the horrendous conditions they had to endure.

The bunnies, being between 2 and 3 years old, were born into outdoor pens with little-to-no socialization with humans. With their entire lives spent in cages without time to play or lovingly touched they came in scared and on the defense.

Like other hoarding cases when a dog or cat or bunny isn’t property cared, left alone, and struggling it can take hours or weeks and weeks – of systematic rehabilitation to have them come around and become comfortable with people and life as a “pet.”

“We are so thankful for our foster families who are working diligently to slowly acclimate them to the human touch, living in a home, and to bond,” said AWA executive director Maya Richmond. “Rabbits are very social and playful pets once socialized properly.”

It is such a sad and slow process for the rabbits, but we are very hopeful that with the right care and compassion they will be able to become wonderful pets in their forever homes. Like any other pet, cats, dogs, guinea pigs, they need just as much love and attention from their humans to thrive in their new environment.

Once they are rehabilitated and made comfortable enough around humans to become adopted they will be placed on AWA’s website and Facebook pages.

Domesticated rabbits cannot live in the wild. We are thankful that acquiring a rabbit at Easter is now longer as popular as it was 10 years ago. But, please remind others to buy only chocolate bunnies at Easter.

Animal Welfare Association, a private, non-profit, 501(c)3 animal welfare organization, serves the people and animals of southern New Jersey. AWA is dedicated to eliminating animal suffering, promoting the importance of the human-animal bond, and improving the role of animals in the well-being of people. Through a variety of programs including adoptions, veterinary services, pet therapy, and humane education. AWA is South Jersey’s leader in progressive companion animal care.

For more information about Animal Welfare Association, visit www.awanj.org.

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