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Twenty-twenty will go down in history as the year of the Covid-19 pandemic, with many lives lost, lockdowns, school and business closings, economic uncertainty and political divisions. In the midst of it all we found a silver lining as New Jerseyans embraced and enjoyed parks and green spaces.

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Winter may seem quiet, almost like nature is taking a break. But is this true?

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It’s hard to overstate the health benefits of walking. A brisk daily walk or hike keeps your body’s systems tuned, and helps with everything from muscle strength to blood pressure to digestion.

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Since the 1970s donations of land and interests in land, known as conservation easements, have benefited from a federal conservation tax deduction. The tax deduction incentive has proven enormously successful and popular across the nation. In fact, the conservation easement tax deduction is …

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In the not-so-distant past, the value of forests was based on the timber generated from logging. Forests without commercial timber potential were thought to be nearly worthless.

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New Jersey’s parks, forests, farms, trails, meadows and wildlife habitats are preserved today in large part due to the many individual conservation trailblazers in this state we’re in. Individuals really do make a difference!

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By this time, most of New Jersey’s nesting migrators have headed south for the winter. Songbirds like orioles, hummingbirds, vireos, and most warblers won’t be seen again until next spring, and while some birds of prey stay during the colder months, tens of thousands of hawks, falcons, and e…

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Many of us love huge old trees. Their beauty, size and feeling of the passing of time leave us in awe. But they also contribute to life on this planet and make it livable for humans and so many incredible life forms. But they also absorb harmful carbon dioxide from the air and release oxygen…

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Can a state park be all things to all people? Can it be an international destination as well as a local park? Can a large urban park provide the serenity of nature, active ball fields and priceless iconic views?

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In his 94 years, British naturalist and broadcaster David Attenborough has explored every part of the Earth, from polar ice caps to equatorial rain forests to African savannas. His acclaimed television series, including “Life on Earth” and “The Blue Planet,” brought exotic animal species int…

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For those who love nature and wildlife, the New Jersey Pine Barrens are a million acres of incomparable beauty and wilderness in the middle of the heavily-developed East Coast corridor. It’s a region rich in rare plants and animals, some found nowhere else on Earth, and has been designated a…

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Growing up in Camden, Olivia Carpenter Glenn suffered from asthma and allergies. She wasn’t alone: many of her family members, friends and neighbors also had respiratory ailments, a result of breathing the polluted air in their industrial city.

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Liberty State Park in Jersey City – the state’s most popular park, with over 5 million annual visitors – has been called New Jersey’s Central Park. But it has something Central Park doesn’t: spectacular views of the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, the Manhattan skyline, New York Harbor and …

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Do you ever read through old newspapers and notice that sometimes the topic and perspective are still pretty current and fresh? So much has changed in the world in recent decades, but our fascination with nature is timeless! Please enjoy the following column written 34 years ago by Dave Moor…

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When you hear “down the shore” in New Jersey, you probably think of the Atlantic coast beaches. But this state we’re in has another coast: 52 miles of shoreline along the Delaware Bay in Cape May, Cumberland and Salem counties.

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In Part I of this Op-Ed, I mentioned the need to do a local and global inspection in order to define where we are today. As we examine our struggle with the plague of racism, our observations must include data and discernment, but without a judgmental spirit. When our judgments are wrong, our decisions become dangerous. For example, our nation must immediately stop seeing all white police officers as racist and all Black men as criminal.

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One of the rarest wildflowers in New Jersey – and the entire northeastern United States - is American chaffseed (Schwalbea americana), a perennial in the snapdragon family.

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Imagine going to your favorite burger joint and ordering the cheeseburger deluxe. You’re with all your friends, and they all order the cheeseburger deluxe as well. Eventually, the server brings the food. All your friends get a cheeseburger deluxe. You? You get a pair of dirty underpants stuffed inside a hamburger bun. And when you politely mention this to the waitstaff, they insist what you’re looking at is indeed a cheeseburger deluxe and not a pair of dirty underpants. Your friends say the same thing. You feel like this must be some kind of joke, this can’t actually be happening, so you politely ask for a cheeseburger in lieu of the soiled underpants.

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Today commemorates the fifty-seventh anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, commonly known as the March on Washington. It was at that march, on Wednesday, August 28, 1963, that a thirty-four-year-old Baptist preacher from Atlanta, Georgia, named Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered a prophetic message in front of the Lincoln Memorial that has historically been entitled as the “I Have A Dream Speech”. His leadership has attributed to the passing of several civil rights bills and voting acts. In fact, just a few years after the march, The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was signed into law on August 6, 1965, by President Lyndon B. Johnson, prohibiting racial discrimination and further enforcing the voting rights guaranteed by the 14th and 15th Amendment to the United States Constitution. It is my prayer and hope that we never forget the words that Dr. King prophetically uttered in August of 1963 to challenge the nation to openly face her racism.

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In the early evening hours of Friday, August 21, Vernetta McCray, an innocent woman, was murdered by individuals that shot twenty-three shots in an apparent drive-by. According to media reports, Ms. McCray was a state worker who had just returned home from her job when she was indiscriminately shot as she was on her front porch on her cellphone dealing with a client,

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Even if a coronavirus vaccine appeared today, and even if everyone took it, and even it works 100% - I may as well add and “even if a mature oak tree sprouts from my belly button - I don’t think the effects of the coronavirus are going to disappear anytime soon - or ever.

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An August 9th front-page story in The New York Times, by Elizabeth Dias, entitled “Christianity Will Have Power” – How a Promise by Trump Bonded Him to White Evangelicals,” was both elucidating and disturbing. The article details how and why “a boastful, thrice-married, foul-mouthed star of …

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If there’s any doubt that New Jersey is the Garden State, visit a local farm stand or farmers’ market. This time of year, you’ll find some of the world’s most delicious produce: fresh Jersey tomatoes, peaches, sweet corn, peppers, blueberries, melons, squash and much more.

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They lived in different parts of New Jersey – John Stokes in Haddonfield, Camden County; Kathleen Caren in West Milford; Passaic County; and JoAnne Ruscio in Delaware Township, Hunterdon County. Their personal and professional paths may never have crossed.

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For most folks, globe-trotting vacations and cross-country road trips are out this year due to travel restrictions and quarantines. Instead, “staycations” within the Garden State seem to be the new fad.

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The summer Olympics in Tokyo are on hold due to the pandemic, just like hundreds of other athletic events ranging from local 5K races and biking events to the New York City Marathon.

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Since the earliest days of human civilization, the night sky has been a source of fascination and mystery. Ancient star-gazers saw human and animal shapes in clusters of stars, and invented elaborate mythologies. Trying to understand the night sky inspired science, religion, philosophy, math…